Die Volksrepublik China liegt im Osten des eurasischen Kontinents, am westlichen Ufer des Pazifiks. Mit insgesamt 9,6 Millionen Quadratkilometern ist China eines der größten Länder der Erde. Damit ist China das drittgrößte Land der Erde. Es macht 1/4 des Festlands Asiens aus und entspricht fast 1/15 der Festlandsfläche der Erde. Die größte Ausdehnung von Ost nach West beträgt über 5 200 km.

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. Die Bevölkerungszahl macht 21% der Weltbevölkerung aus. China ist ein einheitlicher Nationalitätenstaat mit 56 ethnischen Gruppen, wobei die Han-Chinesen 92% der gesamten Bevölkerung ausmachen. Die anderen 55 ethnischen Minderheiten, zu denen zum Beispiel Mongolen, Hui, Tibeter, Uiguren, Miao, Yi, Zhuang, Bouyei, Koreaner, Mandschuren, Dong und Yao zählen, haben vergleichsweise wenigere Angehörige.

China blickt auf eine Geschichte von 5.000 Jahren zurück und ist Heimat einer der ältesten Zivilisationen der Welt. Die lange Geschichte hat nicht nur die kulturelle Vielfalt geschafft, sondern auch zahlreiche historische Relikte hinterlassen. Chinesisch ist die in ganz China verwendete Sprache und auch eine der sechs von der UNO bestimmten Amtssprachen.

China ist ein faszinierendes Reiseziel und hält für den Besucher viele Überraschungen bereit, da China nicht nur aus Peking und Shanghai besteht und keineswegs nur die Chinesische Mauer oder die Verbotene Stadt zu bieten hat. Jeder der 22 Provinzen, 5 autonomen Gebieten, 4 regierungsunmittelbaren Städten und die Sonderverwaltungsgebiete Hongkong und Macao bieten gänzlich unterschiedliche Eindrücke und Erfahrungen bei Reisen nach China.

Unser China Reiseführer steht nicht als PDF zum Download zur Verfügung, jedoch können Sie alle Informationen über die Volksrepublik China kostenlos online lesen.

Ihr Name auf Chinesisch


Sie möchten wissen, wie ihr Name auf Chinesisch lautet? Sie fragen sich, wie Ihr Name auf Chinesisch ausgesprochen und geschrieben wird? Sie suchen einen Namen für ein Tattoo? Die Lösung finden Sie in unserer Rubrik "Namen auf Chinesisch". Egal ob "Érico" oder "Irina". Über 3.000 Vornamen und deren Übersetzung ins Chinesische haben wir schon in unserer Vornamen Datenbank.

Chinesisches Monatshoroskop

Jeden Monat neu! Ihr aktuelles chinesisches Monatshoroskop. Natürlich kostenlos.

Sonnenaufgang und Sonnenuntergang am 26.06.2017 in:


Peking
J 04:47 K 19:46
Shanghai
J 04:51 K 19:02
Guangzhou
J 05:43 K 19:16
Lijiang
J 06:27 K 20:16

Aphorismus des Tages:


Zum Baden braucht man nicht in einen großen Fluss zu steigen. Hauptsache ist, der Schmutz wird entfernt. Zum Reiten ist nicht unbedingt ein edles Pferd vonnöten, Hauptsache ist, es kann gut laufen.


史记


Aphorismus

Auszeichnungen:

Miscellaneous

Alcohol, Noodles, Moon Cake, Spring Rolls, Bean Curd, Roast Duck and “Buddha Jumping over the Wall”.

Random photo: Impressions of China

Alcoholic Drinks and Habits

China is one of the first countries to have invented alcohol as a drink. A large number of pottery wine vessels were discovered in Shangdong at the ruins of the Dawenkou culture, which dates back 5,000 years. Recorded history tells about wine-making techniques of more than 4,000 years ago. The earliest wines were made from food grains, mainly various kinds of rice, broomcorn and millet. As a result of improvements in brewing skills, the yellow wine made its appearance probably in the Warring States Period. From an ancient tomb of the Warring States Period in Pingshan County of Hebei Province, large numbers of wine-storing and drinking vessels were excavated in the 1970s. Two of them contain an alcoholic drink made from wheat 2,280 years ago. It is probably the oldest liquor ever bought to light in the world.

Nowadays, alcohol, wine or beer is usually served on tables. In some areas, people show their hospitality by getting their guests around to drink a lot of liquor, wine or beer.

Noodles

Noodles are a kind of very popular staple food among the Chinese. They can be made either by hand or more often nowadays by machine. By the way they are made, noodles can be divided into cut Noodles or dried noodles. Made in whatever way, they may be of different widths, varying from ribbons to threads to suit the taste or habit of different people. As a prepared dish, they can be served warm or cold, dressed with chilli oil or without, eaten with fried bean sauce, pork or chicken sauce, duck chops and soup of any concoction. There is also a variety of “instant noodles”, which are precooked, dried and commercially packed. Before eating, all one has to do is to soak them in hot, boiling water for a few minutes. They are very handy for a quick lunch in the office or on a journey.

As Noodles are always in the form of long strings, they are symbolic of longevity and therefore indispensable at Chinese birthday dinner parties. As Noodles are smooth to eat, they are symbolic of good wishes for people when they depart, and the wish is often symbolized by smoothness of noodles: people wish everything would go smoothly with friends.

Moon Cake

The Chinese moon cake is for the Mid-Autumn Festival and is so called because it is made in the form of a disc representing the full moon of the festival.

The cake consists of a crust and stuffing. The crust is made in varying ways and with varying degrees of crispness, but the usual main ingredients are wheat flour, oil or fat, sugar and maltose. Part of the flour is mixed with water to make dough, and the rest is kneaded with fat. Arranged in alternate layers the flour becomes the crust after baking. A wide variety of materials may be used for the stuffing, including Chinese ham, sausage, walnuts, pine nuts and almond. The usual flavorings are flowers, rose, ham, jujube paste, pepper and salt, and so on.

Moon cakes are normally called by the fillings they contain – assorted fruits, five nuts, rose, ham, jujube paste, pepper and salt, and so on. The stuffing may be either sweet or salty or mixed in taste. There are literally a thousand and one kinds of moon cakes made in difference regions of China, but it is generally agreed that the best moon cakes are produced by three schools – Jiangsu, Guangdong and Beijing.

Spring Rolls

Spring rolls are a great favorite with the Chinese. They are also very much appreciated abroad. At receptions given by Chinese embassies or consulates, spring rolls often prove to be a gastronomic delight to the guest. It is not without reason that they are served by Chinese restaurants abroad. In China, their appearance on the dining table with their inviting brown color has rarely failed to make foreign tongues click in admiration.

The principal ingredient for the filling in Spring rolls is usually bean sprouts, which are mixed with shredded pork, dried mushroom, plumped and shredded vermicelli, shredded bamboo shoots and the necessary seasonings. The fillings are deep-fried in oil and served hot when the wrappers are still crisp.

Bean Curd (doufu)

Bean curd may be justifiably called a great invention in old China.

An ancient work on medicinal herbs mentioned bean curd in these words: “The method of making doufu dates back to Liu An, the Prince of Huainan. It is made of soya beans, either the black or the yellow variety.” Legend has it that the prince of Liu Bang, in his search for a panacea to help him achieve immortality, experimented with soya beans and bitten and, through the chemical reaction, stumbled on the earliest bean curd. That was more than 2,100 years ago.

An analysis of 100 grams of bean curd shows that it contains water (85 grams), protein (7.4 grams), fat (3.5 grams), calcium (277mg), phosphorus (57 mg) and iron (2.1 mg). As a good of high nutritive value, it has met with widespread acclaim.

Roast Duck

The Beijing Roast duck is a dish well-known among gastronomes the world over.

To cook ducks by direct head dates back at least 1,500 years to the period of the Northern and Southern Dynasties, when “broiled duck” was mentioned in writing. About eight hundred years later, Hu Sihui, imperial dietician to a Mongol emperor of the Yuan Dynasty, listed in his work Essentials of Diet (1330) the grilled duck as a banquet delicacy. It was made by heating the duck stuffed with a mince of sheep’s tripe, parsley, scallion, and salt on a charcoal fire.

Today the Beijing Roast duck (or Peking duck, as it has been called) is made of a special variety of duck fattened by forced feeding in the suburbs of Beijing. After the duck is drawn and cleaned, air is pumped under the skin to separate it more or less from the flesh. And a mixture of oil, sauce and molasses is coated all over it. Thus, when dried and roasted, the duck will look brilliantly red as if painted. Perhaps that is why it is known among some Westerners as the canard lacquer or “lacquered duck”.

A highly experienced chef of a duck restaurant can produce an all-duck banquet of over eighty dishes made of different parts of the fowl.

“Buddha Jumping over the Wall”

This is a well-known dish of Fuzhou. It is made of an assortment of materials: shark fin, shark lip, fish maw, abalone, squid, sea cucumber, chicken breast, duck chops, port tripe, pork leg, minced ham, mutton elbow, dried scallop, winter bamboo shoots, mushrooms, and so on. These are seasoned and steamed separately and then put into a small-mouthed clay jar together with cooking wine and a dozen or so boiled pigeon eggs. The jar is covered and put on intense fire first and then on simmering fire for some time. Four or five ounces of a local liquor is added into the jar, which is kept simmering for another five minutes. Then the dish is ready.

The origin of the dish is explained by a local story. A Fuzhou scholar of the Qing Dynasty went picnicking with friends in the suburbs and he put all the ham, chicken, etc. he had with him in a wine jar which he heated over charcoal fire before eating. The attractive smell of the food spread in the air all the way to a nearby temple. It was so inviting that the monks, who were supposed to be vegetarians, jumped over the temple wall and partook heartily of the scholar’s picnic. One of the party’s participants wrote a poem in praise of the dish, of which a line reads: “Even Buddha himself would jump over the wall to come over”. Hence the name of the dish, “Buddha Jumping over the Wall”.

More about Chinese Cuisine

  • Four Chinese Cuisines
    The vastness of China’s geography and history echoes through the polyphony of the Chinese cuisine.
  • Miscellaneous
    Alcohol, Noodles, Moon Cake, Spring Rolls, Bean Curd, Roast Duck and “Buddha Jumping over the Wall”.
  • Philosophy on Dietetic Health
    With coarse rice to eat, with water to drink, and my bended arm for a pillow –I have still joy in the midst of these things. Riches and honors acquired by unrighteousness are to me as a floating clo...
  • Tea
    Of the three major beverages of the world – tea, coffee and cocoa – tea is consumed by the largest number of people.
  • Delicious Dish
    How well do you make a Chinese dish ( how good are you at making a Chinese dish)?

Alles, was Sie schon immer über den CHINESEN AN SICH UND IM ALLGEMEINEN wissen wollten!

Erfahren Sie, was Ihnen kein Reiseführer und kein Länder-Knigge verrät – und was Ihnen der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen am liebsten verschweigen würde.

Der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen - Alltagssinologie
Autor: Jo Schwarz
Preis: 9,95 Euro
Erschienen im Conbook Verlag, 299 Seiten
ISBN 978-3-943176-90-2

Seit dem 28.06.2006 sind wir durch das Fremdenverkehrsamt der VR China zertifizierter China Spezialist (ZCS). China Reisen können über unsere Internetseite nicht gebucht werden. Wir sind ein Online China Reiseführer.



Nach dem chinesischen Mondkalender, der heute auch als "Bauernkalender" bezeichnet wird, ist heute der 3. Juni 4715. Der chinesische Kalender wird heute noch für die Berechnung der traditionellen chinesischen Feiertage, verwendet.

Werbung

hier werbenhier werben

hier werben
China Reisen

Chinesisch lernen

HSK-Level: 2 (siehe: HSK)
Chinesisch:
Aussprache: réng
Deutsch: bleiben

Sie interessieren sich die chinesische Sprache? Die chinesische Sprache ist immerhin die meistgesprochene Muttersprache der Welt.

Luftverschmutzung in China

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Peking
Datum: 26.06.2017
Uhrzeit: 06:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 19.0
AQI: 66
Definition: mäßig

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Chengdu
Datum: 26.06.2017
Uhrzeit: 06:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 25.0
AQI: 78
Definition: mäßig

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Guangzhou
Datum: 26.06.2017
Uhrzeit: 06:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 8.0
AQI: 33
Definition: gut

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shanghai
Datum: 26.06.2017
Uhrzeit: 06:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 46.0
AQI: 127
Definition: ungesund für empfindliche Gruppen

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shenyang
Datum: 26.06.2017
Uhrzeit: 06:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: No Data
AQI:
Definition:

Mehr über das Thema Luftverschmutzung in China finden Sie in unserer Rubrik Umweltschutz in China.

Beliebte Artikel

A Profile Of China

Among the worlds four most famous ancient civilizations, Chinese civilization is the only one in the world that has been developing for more than 5,000 years without interruption.

Mountain Climbing in China

Mountains afford a good view but climbing also instills a feeling of well being, pride in achievements and arouses a love and understanding of nature and the living environment.

Shaoxing Ancient City

Shaoxing in Zhejiang Province is an ancient city with a history of more than 2,400 years.

Stone Forest Kunming

The Stone Forest In Kunming Yunnan Province.

Chinese Culture

China’s ancient civilization is one of the few civilizations with independent origins, and the only unbroken civilization in human history.

Guilin Introduction

Guilin is one of China’s most popular scenic cities.

China Restaurants in Deutschland

Deutsche verbinden mit chinesischem Essen Frühlingsrollen, Glückskekse und gebratene Nudeln. Die chinesische Küche hat jedoch weitaus mehr zu bieten.

China Restaurants gibt es in Deutschland in jeder Stadt und nahezu jedem Dorf. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Bevölkerung

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. 6. Januar 2005 überschritt erstmals die Bevölkerungsanzahl über 1,3 Mrd. Menschen.

Heute leben in China bereits 1.394.369.093* Menschen.

Alles über Chinas Bevölkerung und Chinas Nationalitäten und Minderheiten oder Statistiken der Städte in China.

* Basis: Volkszählung vom 26.04.2011. Eine Korrektur der Bevölkerungszahl erfolgte am 20.01.2014 durch das National Bureau of Statistics of China die ebenfalls berücksichtigt wurde. Die dargestellte Zahl ist eine Hochrechnung ab diesem Datum unter Berücksichtigung der statistischen Geburten und Todesfälle.

Es gibt keinen erkennbaren Weg vor uns, sondern nur hinter uns.

Hier erfahren Sie mehr über Glückskekse. Das passende Glückskeks Rezept haben wir auch.

Wechselkurs RMB

Umrechnung Euro in RMB (Wechselkurs des Yuan). Die internationale Abkürzung für die chinesische Währung nach ISO 4217 ist CNY.

China Wechselkurs RMBRMB (Yuan, Renminbi)
1 EUR = 7.6413 CNY
1 CNY = 0.130868 EUR

Alle Angaben ohne Gewähr. Wechselkurs der European Central Bank vom Sonntag, dem 25.06.2017.

Unser China Reiseführer kann auch auf Smartphones und Tablet-Computern gelesen werden. So können Sie sich auch unterwegs alle wichtigen Informationen über das Reich der Mitte sowie Reiseinformationen, Reisetipps, Sehenswürdigkeiten, Empfehlungen nachlesen.
china-reisefuehrer.com
© China Reiseführer 2005 - 2017
Impressum
Kontakt
Befreundete Internetseiten
China Newsletter
Sitemap
Design: pixelpainter
auf Google+
China Reiseführer bei Twitter
China Reiseführer bei Twitpic

Uhrzeit in China

Heute ist Montag, der 26.06.2017 um 08:12:25 Uhr (Ortszeit Peking) während in Deutschland erst Montag, der 26.06.2017 um 02:12:25 Uhr ist. Die aktuelle Kalenderwoche ist die KW 26 vom 26.06.2017 - 02.07.2017.

China umspannt mit seiner enormen Ausdehnung die geographische Länge von fünf Zeitzonen. Dennoch hat China überall die gleiche Zeitzone. Ob Harbin in Nordchina, Shanghai an der Ostküste, Hongkong in Südchina oder Lhasa im Westen - es gibt genau eine Uhrzeit. Die Peking-Zeit. Eingeführt wurde die Peking-Zeit 1949. Aus den Zeitzonen GMT+5.5, GMT+6, GMT+7, GMT+8 und GMT+8.5 wurde eine gemeinsame Zeitzone (UTC+8) für das gesamte beanspruchte Territorium. Da die politische Macht in China von Peking ausgeht, entstand die Peking-Zeit.

Der chinesischer Nationalfeiertag ist am 1. Oktober. Es ist der Jahrestag der Gründung der Volksrepublik China. Mao Zedong hatte vor 68 Jahren, am 1. Oktober 1949, die Volksrepublik China ausgerufen. Bis zum 1. Oktober 2017 sind es noch 97 Tage.

Das chinesische Neujahrsfest ist der wichtigste chinesische Feiertag und leitet nach dem chinesischen Kalender das neue Jahr ein. Da der chinesische Kalender im Gegensatz zum gregorianischen Kalender ein Lunisolarkalender ist, fällt das chinesische Neujahr jeweils auf unterschiedliche Tage. Das nächste "Chinesische Neujahrsfest" (chinesisch: 春节), auch Frühlingsfest genannt, ist am 16.02.2018. Bis dahin sind es noch 235 Tage.

Auch das Drachenbootfest "Duanwujie" (chinesisch: 端午節) ist ein wichtiges Fest in China. Es fällt sich wie andere traditionelle Feste in China auf einen besonderen Tag nach dem chinesischen Kalender. Dem 5. Tag des 5. Mondmonats. Es gehört neben dem Chinesischen Neujahrsfest und dem Mondfest zu den drei wichtigsten Festen in China. Das nächste Drachenboot-Fest ist am 18.06.2018. Die nächste Drachenboot-Regatta (Drachenboot-Rennen) wird in 357 Tagen stattfinden.

Das Mondfest oder Mittherbstfest (chinesisch: 中秋节) wird in China am 15. Tag des 8. Mondmonats nach dem traditionellen chinesischen Kalender begangen. In älteren Texten wird das Mondfest auch "Mittherbst" genannt. Das nächste Mondfest ist am 04.10.2017. Traditionell werden zum Mondfest (englisch: Mid-Autumn Festival), welches in 100 Tagen wieder gefeiert wird, Mondkuchen gegessen

Vor 90 Jahren eröffnete in der Kantstraße in Berlin das erste China-Restaurant in Deutschland. 1923 war dies ein großes Ereignis. Fremdes kannten die Deutschen damals nur aus Zeitungen, Kolonialaustellungen und aus dem Zoo. Heute gibt es etwa 10.000 China-Restaurants in Deutschland. Gastronomieexperten schätzen jedoch, dass in nur 5 % (rund 500) Originalgerichte gibt. Üblich sind europäisierte, eingedeutschte Gerichte in einem chinesischen Gewand. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Reiseführer