Die Volksrepublik China liegt im Osten des eurasischen Kontinents, am westlichen Ufer des Pazifiks. Mit insgesamt 9,6 Millionen Quadratkilometern ist China eines der größten Länder der Erde. Damit ist China das drittgrößte Land der Erde. Es macht 1/4 des Festlands Asiens aus und entspricht fast 1/15 der Festlandsfläche der Erde. Die größte Ausdehnung von Ost nach West beträgt über 5 200 km.

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. Die Bevölkerungszahl macht 21% der Weltbevölkerung aus. China ist ein einheitlicher Nationalitätenstaat mit 56 ethnischen Gruppen, wobei die Han-Chinesen 92% der gesamten Bevölkerung ausmachen. Die anderen 55 ethnischen Minderheiten, zu denen zum Beispiel Mongolen, Hui, Tibeter, Uiguren, Miao, Yi, Zhuang, Bouyei, Koreaner, Mandschuren, Dong und Yao zählen, haben vergleichsweise wenigere Angehörige.

China blickt auf eine Geschichte von 5.000 Jahren zurück und ist Heimat einer der ältesten Zivilisationen der Welt. Die lange Geschichte hat nicht nur die kulturelle Vielfalt geschafft, sondern auch zahlreiche historische Relikte hinterlassen. Chinesisch ist die in ganz China verwendete Sprache und auch eine der sechs von der UNO bestimmten Amtssprachen.

China ist ein faszinierendes Reiseziel und hält für den Besucher viele Überraschungen bereit, da China nicht nur aus Peking und Shanghai besteht und keineswegs nur die Chinesische Mauer oder die Verbotene Stadt zu bieten hat. Jeder der 22 Provinzen, 5 autonomen Gebieten, 4 regierungsunmittelbaren Städten und die Sonderverwaltungsgebiete Hongkong und Macao bieten gänzlich unterschiedliche Eindrücke und Erfahrungen bei Reisen nach China.

Unser China Reiseführer steht nicht als PDF zum Download zur Verfügung, jedoch können Sie alle Informationen über die Volksrepublik China kostenlos online lesen.

Ihr Name auf Chinesisch


Sie möchten wissen, wie ihr Name auf Chinesisch lautet? Sie fragen sich, wie Ihr Name auf Chinesisch ausgesprochen und geschrieben wird? Sie suchen einen Namen für ein Tattoo? Die Lösung finden Sie in unserer Rubrik "Namen auf Chinesisch". Egal ob "Sam" oder "Nieves". Über 3.000 Vornamen und deren Übersetzung ins Chinesische haben wir schon in unserer Vornamen Datenbank.

Chinesisches Monatshoroskop

Jeden Monat neu! Ihr aktuelles chinesisches Monatshoroskop. Natürlich kostenlos.

Sonnenaufgang und Sonnenuntergang am 25.07.2017 in:


Peking
J 05:06 K 19:34
Shanghai
J 05:06 K 18:54
Guangzhou
J 05:54 K 19:12
Lijiang
J 06:39 K 20:11

Aphorismus des Tages:


Wie kann man ein Tigerjunges fangen, ohne sich in die Höhle des Tigers zu wagen?


后汉书


Aphorismus

Auszeichnungen:

Jino Minority

The Jino ethnic minority and their customs.

Random photo: Menschen in China

Numbering 20,899 in all, the Jinos live in the Jinoluoke Township of Jinghong County in the Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province.

The language of this ethnic Minority belongs to the Tibetan-Myanmese group of the Chinese-Tibetan language family. Its structure and vocabulary have much in common with Yi and Myanmese. Without a written language of their own, the Jino people used to keep records by notching on wood or bamboo.

Jinoluoke is a mountainous area stretching for 70 kilometers from east to west and 50 kilometers from north to south. The climate There is rainy and subtropical with an average annual temperature of 18 to 20 degrees. The rainy season lasts from May to September with July and August having the heaviest rainfall. The rest of the year is dry.

Jino land is crisscrossed by numerous rivers and streams, the longest Being the Pani and the Small Black rivers. The major crops are upland and wet rice and corn. The famous Pu'er tea grows on Mount Jino. Jinoluoke also has a long history of cotton-growing and is abundant in such tropical fruits as bananas and papayas. Elephants and wild oxen roam the dense primeval forests which are also the habitat of monkeys, hornbills and other birds. Jinoluoke is also rich in mineral resources.

History

It is said that the Jinos migrated to Jinoluoke from Pu'er and Mojiang or places even farther north. It seems likely that they still lived in a matriarchal society when they first settled around the Jino Mountain. Legend has it that the first settler on the mountain ridge was a widow by the name of Jiezhuo. She gave birth to seven boys and seven girls who later married each other. As the population grew, the big family was divided into two groups to live in as many villages, or rather two clans that could intermarry. One was called Citong, the patriarchal village, and the other was Manfeng, the matriarchal village. With the passage of time, the Jino population multiplied and more Jino villages came into existence.

Until some 40 years ago, Jino people from far and near still went to offer sacrifices to their ancestors in the matriarchal and patriarchal villages every year.

The Jino matriarchal society gave way to a patriarchal one some 300 years ago. But the Jinos were still in the transitional stage from a primitive to a class society at the time the People's Republic was founded in 1949.

Most Jinos are farmers. In 1949 they still cultivated land by a slash and burn method, not knowing how to irrigate their crops. Land was communally owned by clans or villages and farmed collectively except in some villages where land was privately owned.

The Jonos are great hunters. When men go out hunting, they shoulder crossbows with poisoned arrows or shot-guns. They are also experts in the use of traps and nooses to catch wild animals. They hunt in groups and divide the game equally among the participants. But the pelts of animals go to the men who shot them. While the men hunt, the women gather wild fruit in the forests. Edible herbs are also collected for soup.

The early ancestors of the Jinos, united by ties of consanguinity into a big family, dwelled in the Jizhuo Mountains in very ancient times. But the social structure of the Jinos had changed by 1949. The basic unit of society was no longer the clan by blood-ties following the emergence of the communal village in which people of different clans lived together. The boundaries of the villages were marked with wooden or stone tablets on which swords and spears were carved. The land within the boundary was communal property, and each village was inhabited by at least two clans whose members could intermarry. Two elders were elected to take care of village administration as well as sacrificial rites and production. Each village was a small, self-contained world.

Primitive egalitarianism still manifests itself to these days in Jino customs. The meat of wild beasts brought back by hunters is divided equally among all adults and children in a village. Even a Small deer is cut into very tiny pieces and shared out among all the villagers, including the new-born. Because of low crop-yields resulting from primitive farming methods and extortion by the Kuomintang and Dai overlords, there was always a shortage of grain for three or four months every year. But despite that, the Jinos stored what little grain they had in unguarded straw sheds outside their houses, and never worried that it would be stolen.

Zhuoba (the village father) and Zhuose (the village mother) were the leaders in a communal village. Being the oldest people in the village, they were respected by all. They became village leaders by virtue of their seniority, not because they were brave in war or eloquent in speech. No matter how mediocre they might be, even if they were blind or deaf, they had to serve as village elders so long as they were the oldest people in the community. After their death, the next eldest in the same clan would be chosen as successors.

Their functions were tinged with time-honored traditions or religion. For instance, the yearly sowing could only begin After the elders had animals slaughtered and offered to the spirits at a ceremony during which the elders put a few seeds in the soil, before the other villagers could start sowing on a big scale. The elders also fixed the dates for holidays. The beating of a big drum and gong in elders' homes ushered in the new year, and all the villagers, young and old, would rush to the elders' homes to sing and dance.

Improvement in Life

Changes began to take place in Jino life in 1954 when teams sent by the government arrived for the first time in the out-of-the-way mountainous areas. They brought relief supplies and helped the local people to step up production. After winning over the powerful village elders, they helped the Jinos undertake democratic reforms to put an end to outdated institutions that had kept them backward for centuries.

And in 1955, the Jinos set up cooperative teams to work the land more effectively. Formerly upland rice was cultivated in Small jungle clearings where the trees were felled and burnt before each sowing. Today the crop is grown on well-prepared paddy fields, and the yield has jumped up enormously. The paddy is irrigated by water lifted by electric pumps. The service of prayer-mumbling priests is no longer needed, nor was the slaughtering of animals, to appease evil spirits in times of drought.

Small reservoirs and hydroelectric installations have been built, and electric lamps have replaced the flickering oil-lamps that once lit Jino homes. The wooden mortars formerly used for pounding rice have gone, too, with the advent of milling equipment powered by electricity.

In 1981 There were 14 primary schools and middle schools with an enrolment of 1,600 in the mountainous areas where most people used to be illiterate. The Jinos now boast their own college students and university-trained doctors.

Another thing the Jinos welcome most is the emergence of a network of trading stores that offer farm implements, clothing, food, salt and a long list of goods at moderate prices. Gone are the travelling cut-throat merchants who used to squeeze every cent out of the pockets of the Jino people.

Life Style

The Jinos live in bamboo houses built on stilts on flat hilltops. The men usually wear collarless white jackets and white or blue trousers made of flax or cotton. Before liberation most men divided their hair into three tufts. Women, as a rule, prefer multi-colored and embroidered collarless short gowns and short black skirts rimmed in red and opened at the front. Many wear long skirts and puttees. They also wear their hair in a coil just above the foreheads, and sling across their shoulders sharp-pointed flax hats. Both men and women go barefooted, and have thick bamboo or wooden sticks plugged into the holes in their earlobes. Those with big holes in their earlobes are considered most beautiful. The Jinos carry things in baskets on their backs with straps tied on their foreheads.

Monogamy is practiced in Jino society. But before marriage the prospective brides and grooms are permitted to have sex. If a woman brings her illegitimate child to live in the home of her husband, both the mother and child are not looked down upon. In some villages, special houses are built for unmarried young men and women to spend the night. But once married, a woman must remain faithful to the husband throughout life. Divorce is rare.

A dead body is put in a coffin carved out of a single log and buried in a communal cemetery. The personal belongings of the dead -- work tools and clothing, and a copper pot of silver for some of the rich -- are buried as sacrificial objects. Above the grave, a Small thatched hut with bamboo tables inside is set up to provide a place for the relatives of the dead to offer meals to the departed soul for a period of one to three years.

Being animists, the Jinos believe that all things on earth have souls. Ancestral worship constitutes an important part of their religious activities. When There was a drought or something untoward happened, a shaman was sent for to mumble prayers and kill oxen, pigs or dogs to appease the trouble-making spirits. Shamans also used to cure diseases with herbal medicines.

The Jinos learn to sing when still very young. They are good at improvising poems and set them to agreeable melodies extemporaneously. At holiday gatherings, the young dance to songs sung by elders. There are many Jino festivals. The biggest one takes place on New Year's Day in March and is celebrated at different dates in different villages. There are worships for "Large Dragon" and "Small Dragon," both of which meant to get rid of disasters and pray for good harvests. A festival is held annually in the wake of a harvest, at which all Jinos gather to help themselves to newly harvested rice.

More About Chinese Ethnic Minority

Alles, was Sie schon immer über den CHINESEN AN SICH UND IM ALLGEMEINEN wissen wollten!

Erfahren Sie, was Ihnen kein Reiseführer und kein Länder-Knigge verrät – und was Ihnen der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen am liebsten verschweigen würde.

Der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen - Alltagssinologie
Autor: Jo Schwarz
Preis: 9,95 Euro
Erschienen im Conbook Verlag, 299 Seiten
ISBN 978-3-943176-90-2

Seit dem 28.06.2006 sind wir durch das Fremdenverkehrsamt der VR China zertifizierter China Spezialist (ZCS). China Reisen können über unsere Internetseite nicht gebucht werden. Wir sind ein Online China Reiseführer.



Nach dem chinesischen Mondkalender, der heute auch als "Bauernkalender" bezeichnet wird, ist heute der 3. Juni 4715. Der chinesische Kalender wird heute noch für die Berechnung der traditionellen chinesischen Feiertage, verwendet.

Werbung

hier werbenhier werben

hier werben
China Reisen

Chinesisch lernen

HSK-Level: 2 (siehe: HSK)
Chinesisch: 左边
Aussprache: zuǒ bian
Deutsch: Links, linke Seite

Sie interessieren sich die chinesische Sprache? Die chinesische Sprache ist immerhin die meistgesprochene Muttersprache der Welt.

Luftverschmutzung in China

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Peking
Datum: 25.07.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 32.0
AQI: 93
Definition: mäßig

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Chengdu
Datum: 25.07.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 36.0
AQI: 102
Definition: ungesund für empfindliche Gruppen

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Guangzhou
Datum: 25.07.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 29.0
AQI: 87
Definition: mäßig

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shanghai
Datum: 25.07.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 43.0
AQI: 119
Definition: ungesund für empfindliche Gruppen

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shenyang
Datum: 25.07.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: No Data
AQI:
Definition:

Mehr über das Thema Luftverschmutzung in China finden Sie in unserer Rubrik Umweltschutz in China.

Beliebte Artikel

A Profile Of China

Among the worlds four most famous ancient civilizations, Chinese civilization is the only one in the world that has been developing for more than 5,000 years without interruption.

Suzhou Introduction

Suzhou known for its resplendent gardens and beautiful scenery.

Chinese Culture

China’s ancient civilization is one of the few civilizations with independent origins, and the only unbroken civilization in human history.

Ningxia Introduction

An Introduction to Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region.

Chongqing Introduction

Chongqing became China’s fourth municipality on March 14, 1997 when the National People’s Congress approved a motion by the State Council.

China Restaurants in Deutschland

Deutsche verbinden mit chinesischem Essen Frühlingsrollen, Glückskekse und gebratene Nudeln. Die chinesische Küche hat jedoch weitaus mehr zu bieten.

China Restaurants gibt es in Deutschland in jeder Stadt und nahezu jedem Dorf. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Bevölkerung

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. 6. Januar 2005 überschritt erstmals die Bevölkerungsanzahl über 1,3 Mrd. Menschen.

Heute leben in China bereits 1.395.157.100* Menschen.

Alles über Chinas Bevölkerung und Chinas Nationalitäten und Minderheiten oder Statistiken der Städte in China.

* Basis: Volkszählung vom 26.04.2011. Eine Korrektur der Bevölkerungszahl erfolgte am 20.01.2014 durch das National Bureau of Statistics of China die ebenfalls berücksichtigt wurde. Die dargestellte Zahl ist eine Hochrechnung ab diesem Datum unter Berücksichtigung der statistischen Geburten und Todesfälle.

Der Vorteil der Klugheit besteht darin, dass man sich dumm stellen kann.

Hier erfahren Sie mehr über Glückskekse. Das passende Glückskeks Rezept haben wir auch.

Wechselkurs RMB

Umrechnung Euro in RMB (Wechselkurs des Yuan). Die internationale Abkürzung für die chinesische Währung nach ISO 4217 ist CNY.

China Wechselkurs RMBRMB (Yuan, Renminbi)
1 EUR = 7.8622 CNY
1 CNY = 0.127191 EUR

Alle Angaben ohne Gewähr. Wechselkurs der European Central Bank vom Dienstag, dem 25.07.2017.

Unser China Reiseführer kann auch auf Smartphones und Tablet-Computern gelesen werden. So können Sie sich auch unterwegs alle wichtigen Informationen über das Reich der Mitte sowie Reiseinformationen, Reisetipps, Sehenswürdigkeiten, Empfehlungen nachlesen.
china-reisefuehrer.com
© China Reiseführer 2005 - 2017
Impressum
Kontakt
Befreundete Internetseiten
China Newsletter
Sitemap
Design: pixelpainter
auf Google+
China Reiseführer bei Twitter
China Reiseführer bei Twitpic

Uhrzeit in China

Heute ist Dienstag, der 25.07.2017 um 16:38:11 Uhr (Ortszeit Peking) während in Deutschland erst Dienstag, der 25.07.2017 um 10:38:11 Uhr ist. Die aktuelle Kalenderwoche ist die KW 30 vom 24.07.2017 - 30.07.2017.

China umspannt mit seiner enormen Ausdehnung die geographische Länge von fünf Zeitzonen. Dennoch hat China überall die gleiche Zeitzone. Ob Harbin in Nordchina, Shanghai an der Ostküste, Hongkong in Südchina oder Lhasa im Westen - es gibt genau eine Uhrzeit. Die Peking-Zeit. Eingeführt wurde die Peking-Zeit 1949. Aus den Zeitzonen GMT+5.5, GMT+6, GMT+7, GMT+8 und GMT+8.5 wurde eine gemeinsame Zeitzone (UTC+8) für das gesamte beanspruchte Territorium. Da die politische Macht in China von Peking ausgeht, entstand die Peking-Zeit.

Der chinesischer Nationalfeiertag ist am 1. Oktober. Es ist der Jahrestag der Gründung der Volksrepublik China. Mao Zedong hatte vor 68 Jahren, am 1. Oktober 1949, die Volksrepublik China ausgerufen. Bis zum 1. Oktober 2017 sind es noch 68 Tage.

Das chinesische Neujahrsfest ist der wichtigste chinesische Feiertag und leitet nach dem chinesischen Kalender das neue Jahr ein. Da der chinesische Kalender im Gegensatz zum gregorianischen Kalender ein Lunisolarkalender ist, fällt das chinesische Neujahr jeweils auf unterschiedliche Tage. Das nächste "Chinesische Neujahrsfest" (chinesisch: 春节), auch Frühlingsfest genannt, ist am 16.02.2018. Bis dahin sind es noch 206 Tage.

Auch das Drachenbootfest "Duanwujie" (chinesisch: 端午節) ist ein wichtiges Fest in China. Es fällt sich wie andere traditionelle Feste in China auf einen besonderen Tag nach dem chinesischen Kalender. Dem 5. Tag des 5. Mondmonats. Es gehört neben dem Chinesischen Neujahrsfest und dem Mondfest zu den drei wichtigsten Festen in China. Das nächste Drachenboot-Fest ist am 18.06.2018. Die nächste Drachenboot-Regatta (Drachenboot-Rennen) wird in 328 Tagen stattfinden.

Das Mondfest oder Mittherbstfest (chinesisch: 中秋节) wird in China am 15. Tag des 8. Mondmonats nach dem traditionellen chinesischen Kalender begangen. In älteren Texten wird das Mondfest auch "Mittherbst" genannt. Das nächste Mondfest ist am 04.10.2017. Traditionell werden zum Mondfest (englisch: Mid-Autumn Festival), welches in 71 Tagen wieder gefeiert wird, Mondkuchen gegessen

Vor 90 Jahren eröffnete in der Kantstraße in Berlin das erste China-Restaurant in Deutschland. 1923 war dies ein großes Ereignis. Fremdes kannten die Deutschen damals nur aus Zeitungen, Kolonialaustellungen und aus dem Zoo. Heute gibt es etwa 10.000 China-Restaurants in Deutschland. Gastronomieexperten schätzen jedoch, dass in nur 5 % (rund 500) Originalgerichte gibt. Üblich sind europäisierte, eingedeutschte Gerichte in einem chinesischen Gewand. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Reiseführer