Die Volksrepublik China liegt im Osten des eurasischen Kontinents, am westlichen Ufer des Pazifiks. Mit insgesamt 9,6 Millionen Quadratkilometern ist China eines der größten Länder der Erde. Damit ist China das drittgrößte Land der Erde. Es macht 1/4 des Festlands Asiens aus und entspricht fast 1/15 der Festlandsfläche der Erde. Die größte Ausdehnung von Ost nach West beträgt über 5 200 km.

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. Die Bevölkerungszahl macht 21% der Weltbevölkerung aus. China ist ein einheitlicher Nationalitätenstaat mit 56 ethnischen Gruppen, wobei die Han-Chinesen 92% der gesamten Bevölkerung ausmachen. Die anderen 55 ethnischen Minderheiten, zu denen zum Beispiel Mongolen, Hui, Tibeter, Uiguren, Miao, Yi, Zhuang, Bouyei, Koreaner, Mandschuren, Dong und Yao zählen, haben vergleichsweise wenigere Angehörige.

China blickt auf eine Geschichte von 5.000 Jahren zurück und ist Heimat einer der ältesten Zivilisationen der Welt. Die lange Geschichte hat nicht nur die kulturelle Vielfalt geschafft, sondern auch zahlreiche historische Relikte hinterlassen. Chinesisch ist die in ganz China verwendete Sprache und auch eine der sechs von der UNO bestimmten Amtssprachen.

China ist ein faszinierendes Reiseziel und hält für den Besucher viele Überraschungen bereit, da China nicht nur aus Peking und Shanghai besteht und keineswegs nur die Chinesische Mauer oder die Verbotene Stadt zu bieten hat. Jeder der 22 Provinzen, 5 autonomen Gebieten, 4 regierungsunmittelbaren Städten und die Sonderverwaltungsgebiete Hongkong und Macao bieten gänzlich unterschiedliche Eindrücke und Erfahrungen bei Reisen nach China.

Unser China Reiseführer steht nicht als PDF zum Download zur Verfügung, jedoch können Sie alle Informationen über die Volksrepublik China kostenlos online lesen.

Ihr Name auf Chinesisch


Sie möchten wissen, wie ihr Name auf Chinesisch lautet? Sie fragen sich, wie Ihr Name auf Chinesisch ausgesprochen und geschrieben wird? Sie suchen einen Namen für ein Tattoo? Die Lösung finden Sie in unserer Rubrik "Namen auf Chinesisch". Egal ob "Bastien" oder "Brigitte". Über 3.000 Vornamen und deren Übersetzung ins Chinesische haben wir schon in unserer Vornamen Datenbank.

Chinesisches Monatshoroskop

Jeden Monat neu! Ihr aktuelles chinesisches Monatshoroskop. Natürlich kostenlos.

Sonnenaufgang und Sonnenuntergang am 20.11.2017 in:


Peking
J 07:04 K 16:55
Shanghai
J 06:25 K 16:53
Guangzhou
J 06:43 K 17:41
Lijiang
J 07:42 K 18:26

Aphorismus des Tages:


Willst Du Deinen Gegner ins Verderben stürzen, musst du ihm zuerst Hilfe leisten. Willst du deinen Gegner seiner Macht berauben, musst du ihm zuerst helfen, seine Macht zu vergrößern.


战国策


Aphorismus

Auszeichnungen:

Dai Minority

The Dai ethnic minority and their customs.

Random photo: Menschen in China

The Dai ethnic group lives in the southern part of Yunnan Province, mainly in the Xishuangbanna region. The area is subtropical, with plentiful rainfall and fertile land.
Local products include rice, sugar cane, coffee, hemp, rubber, camphor and a wide variety of fruits. Xishuangbanna is the home of China's famous Pu'er tea. The dense forests produce large amounts of teak, sandalwood and medicinal plants, and are home to wild animals including elephants, tigers and peacocks.

The Dai language belongs to the Chinese-Tibetan language family and has three major dialects. It is written in an alphabetic script.

Customs and Habits

The marriage of the Dais was characterized by intermarriage on strictly equal social and economic status. Polygamy was common among chieftains, who also humiliated the wives and daughters of peasants at will. The patriarchal monogamous nuclear family was the common form among peasants. Pre-marital social contact between young men and women was quite free, especially During festivals. It was common for the groom to move into the bride's home after the wedding.

The graveyards of aristocrats and poor people were strictly separated. When a monk or a Buddhist leader died, he was cremated and his ashes placed in a pottery urn to be buried behind a temple.

Men wore collarless tight-sleeved short jackets, with the opening at the front or along the right side, and long baggy trousers. In Winter they drape a blanket over their shoulders. They wore black or hite turbans. Tattooing was common. When a boy reached the age of 11 or 12, a tattoo artist was invited to tattoo his body and limbs with designs of animals, flowers, geometric patterns or the Dai written script. Traditionally, women wore tight-sleeved short dresses and sarongs.

Rice is the staple food. The Dais in Dehong prefer dry rice, while those in Xishuangbanna like sticky rice. All love sour and hot flavors. In addition to beef, chicken and duck, they enjoy fish and shrimp. Cabbages, carrots, bamboo shoots and beans are among the popular vegetables. The Dais also love wine, liquor, and betel nuts.

The villages of the Dais in Dehong and Xishuangbanna are found on the plains, near rivers or streams, and among clusters of bamboo. The buildings generally are built on stilts. Some of the houses are square, with two stories. The upper story serves as the living place, while the lower space, without walls, is used as a storehouse and for keeping livestock.

Dai festivals, closely related to religious activities, included the "Door-Closing" festival in mid-June by the lunar calendar, the "Door-Opening" festival in mid-September, and the "Water-Splashing" festival in spring. "Door-Closing" started three months of intensive religious activities. "Door-Opening" marked the beginning of normal life. "Water-Splashing," still held every year, is the most important festival, during which the Dais splash water on one another, and hold dragon boat races in the hope of chasing away all the illnesses and bad fortune of the past year and bringing about good weather and bumper harvests.

The Dais have a rich, colorful culture. They have their own calendar, which started in 638 A.D. There are books in Dai script for calculating solar and lunar eclipses. Dai historical documents carry a rich variety of literary works covering poetry, legends, stories, fables and children's tales. They love to sing and dance, accompanied by their native musical instruments.

History

The history of contact between the Dai and Han peoples dates back to 109 B.C., when Emperor Wu Di of the Han Dynasty set up Yizhou Prefecture in southwestern Yi (the name used to signify the Minority areas of what are now Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou provinces). The Dais in subsequent years sent tribute to the Han court in Luoyang, and among the emissaries were musicians and acrobats. The Han court gave gold seals to the Dai ambassadors and their chieftain was given the title "Great Captain."

According to Chinese documents of the ninth century, the Dais had a fairly well developed agriculture. They used oxen and elephants to till the land, grew large quantities of rice and had built an extensive irrigation system. They used kapok for weaving, panned salt and made weapons of metal. They plated their teeth with gold and silver.

In the 12th century, a Dai chieftain named Bazhen unified all the tribes and established the Mengle local regime with Jinghong as the capital, and called it the "Jinglong Golden Hall Kingdom." According to local records, the kingdom had a population of more than one million, and was famous for white elephants and fine-breed horses. It recognized the Chinese imperial court as its sovereign. When Bazhen ascended the throne, he was given a "tiger-head gold seal" by the Emperor, and the title "Lord of the Region." Previously, the Dais in the Dehong region had established the Mengmao Kingdom, with Ruilijiang as the capital.

During the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), the Dai area was subordinate to Yunnan Province and the system of appointing hereditary headmen from among the ethnic minorities was instituted; this system was consolidated During the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

Past Socio-Economic Conditions

The increasing economic and cultural interflow between the Han and Dai peoples, as well as the migration of many Han people to the frontiers, taking with them advanced production skills and culture and science, promoted the economic development of Dai society. The feudal lord system established in the Dai areas at the end of the Yuan Dynasty and the beginning of the Ming Dynasty further promoted social production. The use of iron implements was widespread, new strains of crops were cultivated, and cotton was grown extensively. A number of fairly large commercial townships such as Cheli were established.

The Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), on the whole, carried on the practice of the Yuan and Ming system in the Minority areas. However, it placed the Dai areas with more advanced economy under its jurisdiction and sent officials to practice direct control. During the Kuomintang rule, a county was set up in the Dai area close to the frontier and the policy of national oppression was carried out through the county administration.

The historical conditions of the Dai communities were not the same, nor were the stages of their social development. So each had its own characteristics as to the form of land ownership, class structure and political system. Such areas as Jingdong, Xinping and Yuanjiang, where the Dais mingled with the Hans, had entered the feudal landlord economy stage earlier because the Dais absorbed the Han's more advanced tools and techniques of production. Social progress was slower in Xishuangbanna and Dehong on the border, particularly Xishuangbanna, which still retained a fairly complete feudal manorial economy.

Since the Yuan, Ming and Qing regimes practiced the system of appointing national-minority hereditary headmen, the "Cheli Official" had for generations been the highest manorial lord and ruler until liberation. All the land, forests and water belonged to him, and he subdivided his domain to be hereditarily ruled by his clan members and trusted followers. Under such a system, part of the land owned directly by the manorial lords became their private manors or served as pay for their household officials. The remaining part was allocated to the serfs and came under the common ownership of the whole village.

The manorial lords established a set of political institutions, and had their own troops, courts and prisons to facilitate their plunder and strengthen their rule.

The frontier Dai areas such as Dehong, Menglian and Gengma were nearly the same as Xishuangbanna, basically having a feudal manorial economy. However, their social economy underwent new changes. The land allocated to the peasants became more stabilized and hereditary, and land rent in kind was widely practiced. In Mangshi and Yingjiang, the landlord economy developed faster and the rich peasant economy also grew, because of the Dai people's frequent contact with the Hans.

For a long time the Dais had grown rice as their main crop, and they had developed a rather complete, intensive farming system and gained rich experience in irrigation. However, under the shackles of feudalism, yields were low. The reckless exploitation by the luxury loving ruling class and the Han landlords and merchants forced many peasants to flee their villages.

Religion of Dai ethnic minority

The religious beliefs of the Dai people were closely related to their economic development. Residents on the borders generally were followers of Hinayana, a sect of Buddhism, while retaining remnants of shamanism. There were many Buddhist temples in the countryside, and it was a common practice, especially in Xishuangbanna, to send young boys to the temples to learn to read and write and chant scriptures, as a form of schooling. Some of them became monks, while most of them returned to secular life. While staying in the temple, the boys had to do all kinds of hard work, and the Dai people had to bear all the financial burden of the temples.

More About Chinese Ethnic Minority

Alles, was Sie schon immer über den CHINESEN AN SICH UND IM ALLGEMEINEN wissen wollten!

Erfahren Sie, was Ihnen kein Reiseführer und kein Länder-Knigge verrät – und was Ihnen der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen am liebsten verschweigen würde.

Der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen - Alltagssinologie
Autor: Jo Schwarz
Preis: 9,95 Euro
Erschienen im Conbook Verlag, 299 Seiten
ISBN 978-3-943176-90-2

Seit dem 28.06.2006 sind wir durch das Fremdenverkehrsamt der VR China zertifizierter China Spezialist (ZCS). China Reisen können über unsere Internetseite nicht gebucht werden. Wir sind ein Online China Reiseführer.



Nach dem chinesischen Mondkalender, der heute auch als "Bauernkalender" bezeichnet wird, ist heute der 3. Oktober 4715. Der chinesische Kalender wird heute noch für die Berechnung der traditionellen chinesischen Feiertage, verwendet.

Werbung

hier werbenhier werben

hier werben
China Reisen

Chinesisch lernen

HSK-Level: 2 (siehe: HSK)
Chinesisch: 从_出发
Aussprache: cóng_chū fā
Deutsch:

Sie interessieren sich die chinesische Sprache? Die chinesische Sprache ist immerhin die meistgesprochene Muttersprache der Welt.

Luftverschmutzung in China

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Peking
Datum: 20.11.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 74.0
AQI: 161
Definition: ungesund

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Chengdu
Datum: 20.11.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 39.0
AQI: 110
Definition: ungesund für empfindliche Gruppen

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Guangzhou
Datum: 20.11.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 5.0
AQI: 21
Definition: gut

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shanghai
Datum: 20.11.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 28.0
AQI: 84
Definition: mäßig

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shenyang
Datum: 20.11.2017
Uhrzeit: 15:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 9.0
AQI: 38
Definition: gut

Mehr über das Thema Luftverschmutzung in China finden Sie in unserer Rubrik Umweltschutz in China.

Beliebte Artikel

Suzhou Introduction

Suzhou known for its resplendent gardens and beautiful scenery.

Chinese Antiques

Ancient China had already developed the techniques of a high level lacquer art and other handicrafts.

A Profile Of China

Among the worlds four most famous ancient civilizations, Chinese civilization is the only one in the world that has been developing for more than 5,000 years without interruption.

Chen Clan Academy

The Chen Clan Academy or Chen’s Ancestral Hall.

Chongqing Introduction

Chongqing became China’s fourth municipality on March 14, 1997 when the National People’s Congress approved a motion by the State Council.

Chinese Tea Ceremony

The Chinese and Japanese have for centuries maintained ceremonial tea rooms where the art of drinking the beverage is central to many people's lives.

China Restaurants in Deutschland

Deutsche verbinden mit chinesischem Essen Frühlingsrollen, Glückskekse und gebratene Nudeln. Die chinesische Küche hat jedoch weitaus mehr zu bieten.

China Restaurants gibt es in Deutschland in jeder Stadt und nahezu jedem Dorf. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Bevölkerung

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. 6. Januar 2005 überschritt erstmals die Bevölkerungsanzahl über 1,3 Mrd. Menschen.

Heute leben in China bereits 1.398.325.710* Menschen.

Alles über Chinas Bevölkerung und Chinas Nationalitäten und Minderheiten oder Statistiken der Städte in China.

* Basis: Volkszählung vom 26.04.2011. Eine Korrektur der Bevölkerungszahl erfolgte am 20.01.2014 durch das National Bureau of Statistics of China die ebenfalls berücksichtigt wurde. Die dargestellte Zahl ist eine Hochrechnung ab diesem Datum unter Berücksichtigung der statistischen Geburten und Todesfälle.


Hier erfahren Sie mehr über Glückskekse. Das passende Glückskeks Rezept haben wir auch.

Wechselkurs RMB

Umrechnung Euro in RMB (Wechselkurs des Yuan). Die internationale Abkürzung für die chinesische Währung nach ISO 4217 ist CNY.

China Wechselkurs RMBRMB (Yuan, Renminbi)
1 EUR = 7.8239 CNY
1 CNY = 0.127813 EUR

Alle Angaben ohne Gewähr. Wechselkurs der European Central Bank vom Montag, dem 20.11.2017.

Unser China Reiseführer kann auch auf Smartphones und Tablet-Computern gelesen werden. So können Sie sich auch unterwegs alle wichtigen Informationen über das Reich der Mitte sowie Reiseinformationen, Reisetipps, Sehenswürdigkeiten, Empfehlungen nachlesen.
china-reisefuehrer.com
© China Reiseführer 2005 - 2017
Impressum
Kontakt
Befreundete Internetseiten
China Newsletter
Sitemap
Design: pixelpainter
auf Google+
China Reiseführer bei Twitter
China Reiseführer bei Twitpic

Uhrzeit in China

Heute ist Montag, der 20.11.2017 um 17:10:41 Uhr (Ortszeit Peking) während in Deutschland erst Montag, der 20.11.2017 um 10:10:41 Uhr ist. Die aktuelle Kalenderwoche ist die KW 47 vom 20.11.2017 - 26.11.2017.

China umspannt mit seiner enormen Ausdehnung die geographische Länge von fünf Zeitzonen. Dennoch hat China überall die gleiche Zeitzone. Ob Harbin in Nordchina, Shanghai an der Ostküste, Hongkong in Südchina oder Lhasa im Westen - es gibt genau eine Uhrzeit. Die Peking-Zeit. Eingeführt wurde die Peking-Zeit 1949. Aus den Zeitzonen GMT+5.5, GMT+6, GMT+7, GMT+8 und GMT+8.5 wurde eine gemeinsame Zeitzone (UTC+8) für das gesamte beanspruchte Territorium. Da die politische Macht in China von Peking ausgeht, entstand die Peking-Zeit.

Der chinesischer Nationalfeiertag ist am 1. Oktober. Es ist der Jahrestag der Gründung der Volksrepublik China. Mao Zedong hatte vor 68 Jahren, am 1. Oktober 1949, die Volksrepublik China ausgerufen. Bis zum 1. Oktober 2018 sind es noch 314 Tage.

Das chinesische Neujahrsfest ist der wichtigste chinesische Feiertag und leitet nach dem chinesischen Kalender das neue Jahr ein. Da der chinesische Kalender im Gegensatz zum gregorianischen Kalender ein Lunisolarkalender ist, fällt das chinesische Neujahr jeweils auf unterschiedliche Tage. Das nächste "Chinesische Neujahrsfest" (chinesisch: 春节), auch Frühlingsfest genannt, ist am 16.02.2018. Bis dahin sind es noch 88 Tage.

Auch das Drachenbootfest "Duanwujie" (chinesisch: 端午節) ist ein wichtiges Fest in China. Es fällt sich wie andere traditionelle Feste in China auf einen besonderen Tag nach dem chinesischen Kalender. Dem 5. Tag des 5. Mondmonats. Es gehört neben dem Chinesischen Neujahrsfest und dem Mondfest zu den drei wichtigsten Festen in China. Das nächste Drachenboot-Fest ist am 18.06.2018. Die nächste Drachenboot-Regatta (Drachenboot-Rennen) wird in 210 Tagen stattfinden.

Das Mondfest oder Mittherbstfest (chinesisch: 中秋节) wird in China am 15. Tag des 8. Mondmonats nach dem traditionellen chinesischen Kalender begangen. In älteren Texten wird das Mondfest auch "Mittherbst" genannt. Das nächste Mondfest ist am 24.09.2018. Traditionell werden zum Mondfest (englisch: Mid-Autumn Festival), welches in 308 Tagen wieder gefeiert wird, Mondkuchen gegessen

Vor 90 Jahren eröffnete in der Kantstraße in Berlin das erste China-Restaurant in Deutschland. 1923 war dies ein großes Ereignis. Fremdes kannten die Deutschen damals nur aus Zeitungen, Kolonialaustellungen und aus dem Zoo. Heute gibt es etwa 10.000 China-Restaurants in Deutschland. Gastronomieexperten schätzen jedoch, dass in nur 5 % (rund 500) Originalgerichte gibt. Üblich sind europäisierte, eingedeutschte Gerichte in einem chinesischen Gewand. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Reiseführer