Die Volksrepublik China liegt im Osten des eurasischen Kontinents, am westlichen Ufer des Pazifiks. Mit insgesamt 9,6 Millionen Quadratkilometern ist China eines der größten Länder der Erde. Damit ist China das drittgrößte Land der Erde. Es macht 1/4 des Festlands Asiens aus und entspricht fast 1/15 der Festlandsfläche der Erde. Die größte Ausdehnung von Ost nach West beträgt über 5 200 km.

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. Die Bevölkerungszahl macht 21% der Weltbevölkerung aus. China ist ein einheitlicher Nationalitätenstaat mit 56 ethnischen Gruppen, wobei die Han-Chinesen 92% der gesamten Bevölkerung ausmachen. Die anderen 55 ethnischen Minderheiten, zu denen zum Beispiel Mongolen, Hui, Tibeter, Uiguren, Miao, Yi, Zhuang, Bouyei, Koreaner, Mandschuren, Dong und Yao zählen, haben vergleichsweise wenigere Angehörige.

China blickt auf eine Geschichte von 5.000 Jahren zurück und ist Heimat einer der ältesten Zivilisationen der Welt. Die lange Geschichte hat nicht nur die kulturelle Vielfalt geschafft, sondern auch zahlreiche historische Relikte hinterlassen. Chinesisch ist die in ganz China verwendete Sprache und auch eine der sechs von der UNO bestimmten Amtssprachen.

China ist ein faszinierendes Reiseziel und hält für den Besucher viele Überraschungen bereit, da China nicht nur aus Peking und Shanghai besteht und keineswegs nur die Chinesische Mauer oder die Verbotene Stadt zu bieten hat. Jeder der 22 Provinzen, 5 autonomen Gebieten, 4 regierungsunmittelbaren Städten und die Sonderverwaltungsgebiete Hongkong und Macao bieten gänzlich unterschiedliche Eindrücke und Erfahrungen bei Reisen nach China.

Unser China Reiseführer steht nicht als PDF zum Download zur Verfügung, jedoch können Sie alle Informationen über die Volksrepublik China kostenlos online lesen.

Ihr Name auf Chinesisch


Sie möchten wissen, wie ihr Name auf Chinesisch lautet? Sie fragen sich, wie Ihr Name auf Chinesisch ausgesprochen und geschrieben wird? Sie suchen einen Namen für ein Tattoo? Die Lösung finden Sie in unserer Rubrik "Namen auf Chinesisch". Egal ob "Ubee" oder "Kathleen". Über 3.000 Vornamen und deren Übersetzung ins Chinesische haben wir schon in unserer Vornamen Datenbank.

Chinesisches Monatshoroskop

Jeden Monat neu! Ihr aktuelles chinesisches Monatshoroskop. Natürlich kostenlos.

Sonnenaufgang und Sonnenuntergang am 17.10.2017 in:


Peking
J 06:26 K 17:32
Shanghai
J 05:58 K 17:20
Guangzhou
J 06:24 K 17:59
Lijiang
J 07:19 K 18:49

Aphorismus des Tages:


玉不琢不成器。


Jade, die nicht bearbeitet wird, wird nicht zu einem Gefäß.


Aphorismus

Auszeichnungen:

Cuisine

A meal in Chinese culture is typically seen as consisting of two general components.

Random photo: Impressions of China

(1) a carbohydrate source or starch, known as 主食 in the Chinese language, (zhǔshí Pinyin , lit. "main food", staple) — typically rice (with rice vinegar for consitency), noodles, or mantou (steamed buns), and (2) accompanying dishes of vegetables, fish, meat, or other items, known as 菜 (càiPinyin , lit. "vegetable") in the Chinese language. (This cultural conceptualization is in some ways in contrast to Western meals where meat or animal protein is often considered the main dish.)

As is well known throughout the world, rice is a critical part of much of Chinese cuisine. However, in many parts of China, particularly northern China, wheat-based products including noodles and steamed buns (饅頭) predominate, in contrast to southern China where rice is dominant. Despite the importance of rice in Chinese cuisine, at extremely formal occasions, it is sometimes the case that no rice at all will be served; in such a case, rice would only be provided when no other dishes remained, or as a token dish at the end of the meal. Soup is usually served at the end of a meal to satiate one's appetite. Owing to Western influences, serving soup in the beginning of a meal is also quite normal in modern times.

Chopsticks are the primary eating utensil in Chinese culture for solid foods, while soups and other liquids are enjoyed [1] with a wide, flat-bottomed spoon (traditionally made of ceramic). It is reported that wooden chopsticks are losing their dominance due to recent logging shortfalls in China and East Asia; many Chinese eating establishments are considering a switch to a more environmentally sustainable eating utensil, such as plastic or bamboo chopsticks. More expensive materials used in the past included ivory and silver. On the other hand, disposable chopsticks made of wood/bamboo have all but replaced reusable ones in small resturants.

In most dishes in Chinese cuisine, food is prepared in bite-sized pieces (e.g. vegetable, meat, doufu), ready for direct picking up and eating. Traditionally, Chinese culture considered using knives and forks at the table "barbaric" due to fact that these implements are regarded as weapons. It was also considered ungracious to have guests work at cutting their own food. Fish are usually cooked and served whole, with diners directly pulling pieces from the fish with chopsticks to eat, unlike in some other cuisines where they are first filleted. This is because it is desired for fish to be served as fresh as possible. A common Chinese saying "including head and tail" refers to the wholeness and completion of a certain task or, in this case, the display of food.

In a Chinese meal, each individual diner is given their own bowl of rice while the accompanying dishes are served in communal plates (or bowls) which are shared by everyone sitting at the table, a communal service known as "family style" in Western nations. In the Chinese meal, each diner picks food out of the communal plates on a bite-by-bite basis with their chopsticks. This is in contrast to Western meals where it is customary to dole out individual servings of the dishes at the beginning of the meal. Many non-Chinese are uncomfortable with allowing a person's individual utensils (which might have traces of saliva) to touch the communal plates; for this hygienic reason, additional serving spoons or chopsticks (公筷, lit. common/public/shared chopsticks) may be made available. The food selected is often eaten together with some rice either in one bite or in alternation.

Vegetarianism is not uncommon or unusual in China, though, as is the case in the West, is still only practiced by a relatively small proportion of the population. The Chinese vegetarian does not eat a lot of tofu, unlike the stereotypical impression in the West. Most Chinese vegetarians are Buddhists. Non-Chinese eating Chinese cuisine will note that a large number of popular vegetable dishes may actually contain meat, as meat chunks or bits have been traditionally used to flavor dishes. Chinese Buddhist Cuisine has many true vegetarian dishes that contain no meat at all.

For much of China's history, human manure has been used as fertilizer due to the large human population and the relative scarcity of farm animals in China. For this reason, raw food (especially raw vegetables such as salad) has not been part of the traditional Chinese diet.

Desserts as such are less typical in Chinese culture than in the West. Chinese meals do not typically end with a dessert or dessert course as is common in Western cuisine. Instead, sweet foods are often introduced during the course of the meal with no firm distinction made. For instance, the basi fruit dishes (sizzling sugar syrup coated fruits such as banana or apple) are eaten alongside other savory dishes that would be considered main course items in the West. However, many sweet foods and dessert snacks do exist in Chinese cuisine. Many are fried, and several incorporate red bean paste (dousha). The matuan and the doushabao is filled with dousha; it is often eaten for breakfast. Some steamed bun items are filled with dousha; some of these are in the shape of peaches, an important Chinese cultural symbol. Another dessert is Ba Bao Fan (八寶飯) or "Eight Treasure Rice".

If dessert is served at the end of the meal, by far the most typical choice is fresh fruit, such as sliced oranges. The second most popular choice is a type of sweet soup, typically made with red beans and sugar. This soup is served warm.

In Chinese culture, cold beverages are believed to be harmful to digestion of hot food, so items like ice-cold water or soft drinks are traditionally not served at meal-time. Besides soup, if any other beverages are served, they would most likely be hot tea or hot water. Tea is believed to help in the digestion of greasy foods.

More about Chinese Cuisine

  • Four Chinese Cuisines
    The Four Chinese Cuisines The vastness of China’s geography and history echoes through the polyphony of the Chinese cuisine.
  • Miscellaneous
    Miscellaneous Alcohol, Noodles, Moon Cake, Spring Rolls, Bean Curd, Roast Duck and “Buddha Jumping over the Wall”.
  • Philosophy on Dietetic Health
    Philosophy on Dietetic Health With coarse rice to eat, with water to drink, and my bended arm for a pillow –I have still joy in the midst of these things. Riches and honors acquired by unrighteousne...
  • Tea
    China, the Homeland of Tea Of the three major beverages of the world – tea, coffee and cocoa – tea is consumed by the largest number of people.
  • Delicious Dish
    Delicious Dish How well do you make a Chinese dish ( how good are you at making a Chinese dish)?

Alles, was Sie schon immer über den CHINESEN AN SICH UND IM ALLGEMEINEN wissen wollten!

Erfahren Sie, was Ihnen kein Reiseführer und kein Länder-Knigge verrät – und was Ihnen der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen am liebsten verschweigen würde.

Der Chinese an sich und im Allgemeinen - Alltagssinologie
Autor: Jo Schwarz
Preis: 9,95 Euro
Erschienen im Conbook Verlag, 299 Seiten
ISBN 978-3-943176-90-2

Seit dem 28.06.2006 sind wir durch das Fremdenverkehrsamt der VR China zertifizierter China Spezialist (ZCS). China Reisen können über unsere Internetseite nicht gebucht werden. Wir sind ein Online China Reiseführer.



Nach dem chinesischen Mondkalender, der heute auch als "Bauernkalender" bezeichnet wird, ist heute der 28. August 4715. Der chinesische Kalender wird heute noch für die Berechnung der traditionellen chinesischen Feiertage, verwendet.

Werbung

hier werbenhier werben

hier werben
China Reisen

Chinesisch lernen

HSK-Level: 3 (siehe: HSK)
Chinesisch: 富裕
Aussprache: fù yù
Deutsch: gut situiert, wohlhabend

Sie interessieren sich die chinesische Sprache? Die chinesische Sprache ist immerhin die meistgesprochene Muttersprache der Welt.

Weitere Artikel zum Thema

Four Chinese Cuisines

The vastness of China’s geography and history echoes through the polyphony of the Chinese cuisine.

Miscellaneous

Alcohol, Noodles, Moon Cake, Spring Rolls, Bean Curd, Roast Duck and “Buddha Jumping over the Wall”.

Philosophy on Dietetic Health

With coarse rice to eat, with water to drink, and my bended arm for a pillow –I have still joy in the midst of these things. Riches and honors acquired by unrighteousness are to me as a floating clo...

Tea

Of the three major beverages of the world – tea, coffee and cocoa – tea is consumed by the largest number of people.

Delicious Dish

How well do you make a Chinese dish ( how good are you at making a Chinese dish)?

Luftverschmutzung in China

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Peking
Datum: 17.10.2017
Uhrzeit: 08:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 61.0
AQI: 154
Definition: ungesund

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Chengdu
Datum: 17.10.2017
Uhrzeit: 08:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 49.0
AQI: 134
Definition: ungesund für empfindliche Gruppen

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Guangzhou
Datum: 17.10.2017
Uhrzeit: 08:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 3.0
AQI: 13
Definition: gut

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shanghai
Datum: 17.10.2017
Uhrzeit: 08:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 34.0
AQI: 97
Definition: mäßig

Feinstaubwerte (PM2.5) Shenyang
Datum: 17.10.2017
Uhrzeit: 08:00 Uhr (Ortszeit)
Konzentration: 87.0
AQI: 167
Definition: ungesund

Mehr über das Thema Luftverschmutzung in China finden Sie in unserer Rubrik Umweltschutz in China.

Beliebte Artikel

A Profile Of China

Among the worlds four most famous ancient civilizations, Chinese civilization is the only one in the world that has been developing for more than 5,000 years without interruption.

Bashang Grassland Introduction

The Bashang Grassland in Hebei Province is an ideal place to escape the heat in summer.

Shenzhen Introduction

Shenzhen was designated as a special economic zone by the central government in 1980.

Chinese Philosophy

Chinese Philosophy - The Soul of Traditional Chinese Culture. The Study of the Universe and Man.

Achang Minority

The Achang ethnic minority and their customs.

Russian Minority

The Russian ethnic minority and their customs.

China Restaurants in Deutschland

Deutsche verbinden mit chinesischem Essen Frühlingsrollen, Glückskekse und gebratene Nudeln. Die chinesische Küche hat jedoch weitaus mehr zu bieten.

China Restaurants gibt es in Deutschland in jeder Stadt und nahezu jedem Dorf. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Bevölkerung

China ist das bevölkerungsreichste Land der Welt. 6. Januar 2005 überschritt erstmals die Bevölkerungsanzahl über 1,3 Mrd. Menschen.

Heute leben in China bereits 1.397.405.126* Menschen.

Alles über Chinas Bevölkerung und Chinas Nationalitäten und Minderheiten oder Statistiken der Städte in China.

* Basis: Volkszählung vom 26.04.2011. Eine Korrektur der Bevölkerungszahl erfolgte am 20.01.2014 durch das National Bureau of Statistics of China die ebenfalls berücksichtigt wurde. Die dargestellte Zahl ist eine Hochrechnung ab diesem Datum unter Berücksichtigung der statistischen Geburten und Todesfälle.


Hier erfahren Sie mehr über Glückskekse. Das passende Glückskeks Rezept haben wir auch.

Wechselkurs RMB

Umrechnung Euro in RMB (Wechselkurs des Yuan). Die internationale Abkürzung für die chinesische Währung nach ISO 4217 ist CNY.

China Wechselkurs RMBRMB (Yuan, Renminbi)
1 EUR = 7.7831 CNY
1 CNY = 0.128484 EUR

Alle Angaben ohne Gewähr. Wechselkurs der European Central Bank vom Montag, dem 16.10.2017.

Unser China Reiseführer kann auch auf Smartphones und Tablet-Computern gelesen werden. So können Sie sich auch unterwegs alle wichtigen Informationen über das Reich der Mitte sowie Reiseinformationen, Reisetipps, Sehenswürdigkeiten, Empfehlungen nachlesen.
china-reisefuehrer.com
© China Reiseführer 2005 - 2017
Impressum
Kontakt
Befreundete Internetseiten
China Newsletter
Sitemap
Design: pixelpainter
auf Google+
China Reiseführer bei Twitter
China Reiseführer bei Twitpic

Uhrzeit in China

Heute ist Dienstag, der 17.10.2017 um 10:13:56 Uhr (Ortszeit Peking) während in Deutschland erst Dienstag, der 17.10.2017 um 04:13:56 Uhr ist. Die aktuelle Kalenderwoche ist die KW 42 vom 16.10.2017 - 22.10.2017.

China umspannt mit seiner enormen Ausdehnung die geographische Länge von fünf Zeitzonen. Dennoch hat China überall die gleiche Zeitzone. Ob Harbin in Nordchina, Shanghai an der Ostküste, Hongkong in Südchina oder Lhasa im Westen - es gibt genau eine Uhrzeit. Die Peking-Zeit. Eingeführt wurde die Peking-Zeit 1949. Aus den Zeitzonen GMT+5.5, GMT+6, GMT+7, GMT+8 und GMT+8.5 wurde eine gemeinsame Zeitzone (UTC+8) für das gesamte beanspruchte Territorium. Da die politische Macht in China von Peking ausgeht, entstand die Peking-Zeit.

Der chinesischer Nationalfeiertag ist am 1. Oktober. Es ist der Jahrestag der Gründung der Volksrepublik China. Mao Zedong hatte vor 68 Jahren, am 1. Oktober 1949, die Volksrepublik China ausgerufen. Bis zum 1. Oktober 2018 sind es noch 349 Tage.

Das chinesische Neujahrsfest ist der wichtigste chinesische Feiertag und leitet nach dem chinesischen Kalender das neue Jahr ein. Da der chinesische Kalender im Gegensatz zum gregorianischen Kalender ein Lunisolarkalender ist, fällt das chinesische Neujahr jeweils auf unterschiedliche Tage. Das nächste "Chinesische Neujahrsfest" (chinesisch: 春节), auch Frühlingsfest genannt, ist am 16.02.2018. Bis dahin sind es noch 122 Tage.

Auch das Drachenbootfest "Duanwujie" (chinesisch: 端午節) ist ein wichtiges Fest in China. Es fällt sich wie andere traditionelle Feste in China auf einen besonderen Tag nach dem chinesischen Kalender. Dem 5. Tag des 5. Mondmonats. Es gehört neben dem Chinesischen Neujahrsfest und dem Mondfest zu den drei wichtigsten Festen in China. Das nächste Drachenboot-Fest ist am 18.06.2018. Die nächste Drachenboot-Regatta (Drachenboot-Rennen) wird in 244 Tagen stattfinden.

Das Mondfest oder Mittherbstfest (chinesisch: 中秋节) wird in China am 15. Tag des 8. Mondmonats nach dem traditionellen chinesischen Kalender begangen. In älteren Texten wird das Mondfest auch "Mittherbst" genannt. Das nächste Mondfest ist am 24.09.2018. Traditionell werden zum Mondfest (englisch: Mid-Autumn Festival), welches in 342 Tagen wieder gefeiert wird, Mondkuchen gegessen

Vor 90 Jahren eröffnete in der Kantstraße in Berlin das erste China-Restaurant in Deutschland. 1923 war dies ein großes Ereignis. Fremdes kannten die Deutschen damals nur aus Zeitungen, Kolonialaustellungen und aus dem Zoo. Heute gibt es etwa 10.000 China-Restaurants in Deutschland. Gastronomieexperten schätzen jedoch, dass in nur 5 % (rund 500) Originalgerichte gibt. Üblich sind europäisierte, eingedeutschte Gerichte in einem chinesischen Gewand. Finden Sie "ihren Chinesen" in Ihrer Stadt: China Restaurants in Deutschland im China Branchenbuch.

China Reiseführer